Don’t assume that everything works

If you don’t check, how will you know?

picture of a cellphone tower

I was in town yesterday, posting cards for Christmas. Due to a mistake on my part I inadvertently sent the card intended for my brother in Australia to somebody else: leaving me a card short. In case you weren’t aware, yesterday was the last posting day for mail to Australia, so I needed to buy a new card and fill it in whilst in town.

Imagine my consternation when I found that my brother’s contact details were not on my iPhone. I know they were in my Mac address book, but somehow hadn’t sync’d.

A minor mishap of course (and easily rectified thanks to the wonderful Plaxo), but it highlighted how dependent we can become on technology and how much we assume that things just work without ever actually checking.

Why not apply the principle of occasionally checking that processes are working by:

  • checking that contact lists are synchronising between devices;
  • checking that computer backups are actually backing up critical data;
  • testing UPS batteries to make sure they in good condition;
  • testing that fire alarms do actually work;
  • ditto smoke and gas detectors;
  • etc, etc.

Don’t be surprised by seemingly automatic processes not working as expected. Understand that you are still responsible, and take action.

Image courtesy of Wikimedia commons


Agdon Associates and Business Continuity UK are no longer in business. This website is not being updated: it has been left online solely as a source of useful information on Business Continuity.

If you found this article interesting, please help me by clicking the Google +1 button and/or the Facebook Like button. If you wish, you could Tweet it as well.
Thank You

Sorry, comments are closed for this post.

Don’t assume that everything works

If you don’t check, how will you know?

picture of a cellphone tower

I was in town yesterday, posting cards for Christmas. Due to a mistake on my part I inadvertently sent the card intended for my brother in Australia to somebody else: leaving me a card short. In case you weren’t aware, yesterday was the last posting day for mail to Australia, so I needed to buy a new card and fill it in whilst in town.

Imagine my consternation when I found that my brother’s contact details were not on my iPhone. I know they were in my Mac address book, but somehow hadn’t sync’d.

A minor mishap of course (and easily rectified thanks to the wonderful Plaxo), but it highlighted how dependent we can become on technology and how much we assume that things just work without ever actually checking.

Why not apply the principle of occasionally checking that processes are working by:

  • checking that contact lists are synchronising between devices;
  • checking that computer backups are actually backing up critical data;
  • testing UPS batteries to make sure they in good condition;
  • testing that fire alarms do actually work;
  • ditto smoke and gas detectors;
  • etc, etc.

Don’t be surprised by seemingly automatic processes not working as expected. Understand that you are still responsible, and take action.

Image courtesy of Wikimedia commons


Agdon Associates and Business Continuity UK are no longer in business. This website is not being updated: it has been left online solely as a source of useful information on Business Continuity.

If you found this article interesting, please help me by clicking the Google +1 button and/or the Facebook Like button. If you wish, you could Tweet it as well.
Thank You

Sorry, comments are closed for this post.

Don’t assume that everything works

If you don’t check, how will you know?

picture of a cellphone tower

I was in town yesterday, posting cards for Christmas. Due to a mistake on my part I inadvertently sent the card intended for my brother in Australia to somebody else: leaving me a card short. In case you weren’t aware, yesterday was the last posting day for mail to Australia, so I needed to buy a new card and fill it in whilst in town.

Imagine my consternation when I found that my brother’s contact details were not on my iPhone. I know they were in my Mac address book, but somehow hadn’t sync’d.

A minor mishap of course (and easily rectified thanks to the wonderful Plaxo), but it highlighted how dependent we can become on technology and how much we assume that things just work without ever actually checking.

Why not apply the principle of occasionally checking that processes are working by:

  • checking that contact lists are synchronising between devices;
  • checking that computer backups are actually backing up critical data;
  • testing UPS batteries to make sure they in good condition;
  • testing that fire alarms do actually work;
  • ditto smoke and gas detectors;
  • etc, etc.

Don’t be surprised by seemingly automatic processes not working as expected. Understand that you are still responsible, and take action.

Image courtesy of Wikimedia commons


Agdon Associates and Business Continuity UK are no longer in business. This website is not being updated: it has been left online solely as a source of useful information on Business Continuity.

If you found this article interesting, please help me by clicking the Google +1 button and/or the Facebook Like button. If you wish, you could Tweet it as well.
Thank You

Sorry, comments are closed for this post.