How to improve the quality of your Business Continuity Plan

I’ve just been reading an excellent article by Kevin Howells over on Continuity Central entitled
Ten easy ways to improve your business continuity plan.

In it, the author bemoans the failings in some of the business continuity plans he has had the pleasure to review. I won’t repeat the article, other than to precis the ten issues he has come across too often:

  • Too IT specific
  • Scoped too narrowly
  • Not process driven
  • Insufficient documention
  • Outdated
  • Untested
  • Too complicated
  • Written as set of actions rather than a set of results
  • Based on poor assumptions
  • No media planning

All of these aspects need attention in any usable business continuity plan and will be covered naturally if the proper process has been followed when creating the plan. This process involves:

  • Understanding the organisation, its critical business processes and the threats to which those critical processes might be exposed.
  • Developing appropriate strategies for coping with those threats.
  • Creating plans that detail what the organisation is going to do when things go wrong.
  • Implementing measures and process changes needed to implement the strategies.
  • Testing, auditing and revising the plans as the business changes.

All of these steps should be followed at the outset and as part of the normal Business As Usual culture as the organisation develops.

By following these steps and getting into the habit of always thinking about the business continuity implications of any process changes, organisations can significantly improve their chances of long term survival and success.


Agdon Associates and Business Continuity UK are no longer in business. This website is not being updated: it has been left online solely as a source of useful information on Business Continuity.

If you found this article interesting, please help me by clicking the Google +1 button and/or the Facebook Like button. If you wish, you could Tweet it as well.
Thank You

Sorry, comments are closed for this post.

How to improve the quality of your Business Continuity Plan

I’ve just been reading an excellent article by Kevin Howells over on Continuity Central entitled
Ten easy ways to improve your business continuity plan.

In it, the author bemoans the failings in some of the business continuity plans he has had the pleasure to review. I won’t repeat the article, other than to precis the ten issues he has come across too often:

  • Too IT specific
  • Scoped too narrowly
  • Not process driven
  • Insufficient documention
  • Outdated
  • Untested
  • Too complicated
  • Written as set of actions rather than a set of results
  • Based on poor assumptions
  • No media planning

All of these aspects need attention in any usable business continuity plan and will be covered naturally if the proper process has been followed when creating the plan. This process involves:

  • Understanding the organisation, its critical business processes and the threats to which those critical processes might be exposed.
  • Developing appropriate strategies for coping with those threats.
  • Creating plans that detail what the organisation is going to do when things go wrong.
  • Implementing measures and process changes needed to implement the strategies.
  • Testing, auditing and revising the plans as the business changes.

All of these steps should be followed at the outset and as part of the normal Business As Usual culture as the organisation develops.

By following these steps and getting into the habit of always thinking about the business continuity implications of any process changes, organisations can significantly improve their chances of long term survival and success.


Agdon Associates and Business Continuity UK are no longer in business. This website is not being updated: it has been left online solely as a source of useful information on Business Continuity.

If you found this article interesting, please help me by clicking the Google +1 button and/or the Facebook Like button. If you wish, you could Tweet it as well.
Thank You

Sorry, comments are closed for this post.

How to improve the quality of your Business Continuity Plan

I’ve just been reading an excellent article by Kevin Howells over on Continuity Central entitled
Ten easy ways to improve your business continuity plan.

In it, the author bemoans the failings in some of the business continuity plans he has had the pleasure to review. I won’t repeat the article, other than to precis the ten issues he has come across too often:

  • Too IT specific
  • Scoped too narrowly
  • Not process driven
  • Insufficient documention
  • Outdated
  • Untested
  • Too complicated
  • Written as set of actions rather than a set of results
  • Based on poor assumptions
  • No media planning

All of these aspects need attention in any usable business continuity plan and will be covered naturally if the proper process has been followed when creating the plan. This process involves:

  • Understanding the organisation, its critical business processes and the threats to which those critical processes might be exposed.
  • Developing appropriate strategies for coping with those threats.
  • Creating plans that detail what the organisation is going to do when things go wrong.
  • Implementing measures and process changes needed to implement the strategies.
  • Testing, auditing and revising the plans as the business changes.

All of these steps should be followed at the outset and as part of the normal Business As Usual culture as the organisation develops.

By following these steps and getting into the habit of always thinking about the business continuity implications of any process changes, organisations can significantly improve their chances of long term survival and success.


Agdon Associates and Business Continuity UK are no longer in business. This website is not being updated: it has been left online solely as a source of useful information on Business Continuity.

If you found this article interesting, please help me by clicking the Google +1 button and/or the Facebook Like button. If you wish, you could Tweet it as well.
Thank You

Sorry, comments are closed for this post.