What if you can’t get to the office?

Make sure you start to implement your plans before it goes wrong

As we move into the winter here in the UK, we stand a reasonable chance of having a few days, at least, where normal business operation is likely to be difficult, if not impossible, because of snow or ice. The question is: how will you react?

  • Will you demand that staff make all attempts to get into work – disregarding any Health & Safety implications?
  • Will you shrug your shoulders and shut down?
  • Will you shut down, but fret because you are failing your customers?
  • Or will you relax in the knowledge that you have planned for such an eventuality and that your plans are working?

Bad weather is a risk that is not only foreseeable, but is also, more or less, predictable. You can take advantage of this to ease the pain when the bad weather hits.

Remote Working

If your staff could work from home for a short period, one or two days, then perhaps you could take advantage of this and enable it to happen. You could have a stock of laptop computers configured with secure remote access that are issued when required. Or, you could take advantage of some of the desktop virtualisation technologies to allow remote workers to gain secure access to their office computers and servers from their home computers.

If you do opt to issue staff with laptops, the question arises: “When do I issue the laptops?”

A simple approach is to have a staged response to the incident, like is done for pandemic flu. It could go something like:

  • Stage 1 – When average night time temps are predicted to drop below xx degrees in the next 7 days, check the laptops work, are up to date and have charged batteries.
  • Stage 2 – When night time minimum temps are predicted to drop below xx degrees, or snow is forecast; issue the laptops to staff with instructions to take them home, connect them up and go through a pre-defined checklist to confirm they are functioning correctly.
  • Stage 3 – When snow falls exceed xx cms, issue instructions to staff to work from home following a pre-defined procedure to access their office resources.

Your detailed procedures will differ depending on what you decide to do, but you should get the general idea.

Bad weather can be extremely disruptive: if you let it. If you prepare for it however, bad weather needn’t be so disruptive that your business suffers permanent damage: and that’s what Business Continuity Planning attempts to prevent.

 Image courtesy of wikimedia commons


Agdon Associates and Business Continuity UK are no longer in business. This website is not being updated: it has been left online solely as a source of useful information on Business Continuity.

If you found this article interesting, please help me by clicking the Google +1 button and/or the Facebook Like button. If you wish, you could Tweet it as well.
Thank You

Sorry, comments are closed for this post.

What if you can’t get to the office?

Make sure you start to implement your plans before it goes wrong

As we move into the winter here in the UK, we stand a reasonable chance of having a few days, at least, where normal business operation is likely to be difficult, if not impossible, because of snow or ice. The question is: how will you react?

  • Will you demand that staff make all attempts to get into work – disregarding any Health & Safety implications?
  • Will you shrug your shoulders and shut down?
  • Will you shut down, but fret because you are failing your customers?
  • Or will you relax in the knowledge that you have planned for such an eventuality and that your plans are working?

Bad weather is a risk that is not only foreseeable, but is also, more or less, predictable. You can take advantage of this to ease the pain when the bad weather hits.

Remote Working

If your staff could work from home for a short period, one or two days, then perhaps you could take advantage of this and enable it to happen. You could have a stock of laptop computers configured with secure remote access that are issued when required. Or, you could take advantage of some of the desktop virtualisation technologies to allow remote workers to gain secure access to their office computers and servers from their home computers.

If you do opt to issue staff with laptops, the question arises: “When do I issue the laptops?”

A simple approach is to have a staged response to the incident, like is done for pandemic flu. It could go something like:

  • Stage 1 – When average night time temps are predicted to drop below xx degrees in the next 7 days, check the laptops work, are up to date and have charged batteries.
  • Stage 2 – When night time minimum temps are predicted to drop below xx degrees, or snow is forecast; issue the laptops to staff with instructions to take them home, connect them up and go through a pre-defined checklist to confirm they are functioning correctly.
  • Stage 3 – When snow falls exceed xx cms, issue instructions to staff to work from home following a pre-defined procedure to access their office resources.

Your detailed procedures will differ depending on what you decide to do, but you should get the general idea.

Bad weather can be extremely disruptive: if you let it. If you prepare for it however, bad weather needn’t be so disruptive that your business suffers permanent damage: and that’s what Business Continuity Planning attempts to prevent.

 Image courtesy of wikimedia commons


Agdon Associates and Business Continuity UK are no longer in business. This website is not being updated: it has been left online solely as a source of useful information on Business Continuity.

If you found this article interesting, please help me by clicking the Google +1 button and/or the Facebook Like button. If you wish, you could Tweet it as well.
Thank You

Sorry, comments are closed for this post.

What if you can’t get to the office?

Make sure you start to implement your plans before it goes wrong

As we move into the winter here in the UK, we stand a reasonable chance of having a few days, at least, where normal business operation is likely to be difficult, if not impossible, because of snow or ice. The question is: how will you react?

  • Will you demand that staff make all attempts to get into work – disregarding any Health & Safety implications?
  • Will you shrug your shoulders and shut down?
  • Will you shut down, but fret because you are failing your customers?
  • Or will you relax in the knowledge that you have planned for such an eventuality and that your plans are working?

Bad weather is a risk that is not only foreseeable, but is also, more or less, predictable. You can take advantage of this to ease the pain when the bad weather hits.

Remote Working

If your staff could work from home for a short period, one or two days, then perhaps you could take advantage of this and enable it to happen. You could have a stock of laptop computers configured with secure remote access that are issued when required. Or, you could take advantage of some of the desktop virtualisation technologies to allow remote workers to gain secure access to their office computers and servers from their home computers.

If you do opt to issue staff with laptops, the question arises: “When do I issue the laptops?”

A simple approach is to have a staged response to the incident, like is done for pandemic flu. It could go something like:

  • Stage 1 – When average night time temps are predicted to drop below xx degrees in the next 7 days, check the laptops work, are up to date and have charged batteries.
  • Stage 2 – When night time minimum temps are predicted to drop below xx degrees, or snow is forecast; issue the laptops to staff with instructions to take them home, connect them up and go through a pre-defined checklist to confirm they are functioning correctly.
  • Stage 3 – When snow falls exceed xx cms, issue instructions to staff to work from home following a pre-defined procedure to access their office resources.

Your detailed procedures will differ depending on what you decide to do, but you should get the general idea.

Bad weather can be extremely disruptive: if you let it. If you prepare for it however, bad weather needn’t be so disruptive that your business suffers permanent damage: and that’s what Business Continuity Planning attempts to prevent.

 Image courtesy of wikimedia commons


Agdon Associates and Business Continuity UK are no longer in business. This website is not being updated: it has been left online solely as a source of useful information on Business Continuity.

If you found this article interesting, please help me by clicking the Google +1 button and/or the Facebook Like button. If you wish, you could Tweet it as well.
Thank You

Sorry, comments are closed for this post.